vulnerability

Cracked: New Light on Dementia

This is a unique event that is sure to impress. We hope you can join us for the Western Canadian premiere of “Cracked: New Light on Dementia”!

Date: Saturday, September 21

Location: Glenbow Museum Theatre (130 9 Ave SE)

Time: 1 – 3 p.m.

This is a free event, but registration is required.

Top Concerns About Living a Long Life

51%    Health problems/costs

47%    Financial security/fear of running out of money

40%    Being a burden on family

20%    Loneliness or having no purpose

14%    Having nothing left to leave to heirs

13%    Being a victim of abuse, neglect or fraud

2%      Other

Source: BMO Wealth Management survey by ValidateIt Technologies Inc., July 2018.

Overall, the most frequently cited concern was about future healthcare costs and whether health problems will affect quality of life (51%).

Fears about running out of money during retirement (47%) and being a burden on family members (40%) also came high on the list.

Being lonely later in life was a concern for 20% of respondents, and not having anything left to leave to heirs was mentioned by 14% of those surveyed.

A similar number (13% of respondents) worried about becoming a victim of abuse, neglect or fraud.

Financial Concierge Inc. can help mitigate the risks of financial abuse and fraud through assistance with day to day money management as a second set of eyes.

Posted by Admin-FCI in Seniors Health and Wellness, 0 comments

Dementia, Alberta’s Position

For every person who is diagnosed with dementia, 10 to 12 additional individuals are also directly affected by the diagnosis.

The lifetime risk of dementia is 1 in 5 for women and 1 in 10 for men. More than 17,000 Calgarians (about 10% of our seniors) live with dementia and 8 more will develop it today (2,800 this year).  In addition, there are thousands of people living with undiagnosed dementia. Even more concerning is the fact that these numbers are expected to double within the next 20 years. As a growing social and systemic issue, dementia has the potential to overwhelm families, communities, workforces and our healthcare systems in Calgary.

dementia network calgary

Posted by Admin-FCI in Seniors Health and Wellness, 0 comments

Older Adults Living Alone

Why go it alone?

A recent study noted in a Washington Post article by writer Judith Graham, notes that 22% of older adults in the US fall into a group called “elder orphans” or “solo agers”, referring to people who live alone and have no spouse or children. These people, no different than those who are fortunate enough to have family around in their later years, still need services than most elderly people need when they can no longer carry on alone. The luckier ones may have the option to relocate to a seniors’ facility where they can receive the care they need. Others may need to rely on friends or perhaps contract the needed services from a private home care provider where the elderly person may continue to line in their home.

In a survey of 500 people who identified with the Elder Orphan Facebook Group or 8,500 members, 70% of them stated that they had not identified a caregiver and 35% said they did not have friends or family to help them cope with their new challenges. About 31% of them said they were concerned about their future financial security and 23% said they had experienced at least one instance in the past year where they were not able to meet a financial obligation.

While the above focused on single individuals without a spouse or children, it could be easily considered to apply to aging singles who may have children living at great distances from them and who are not easily able to help in a timely manner. For some elderly singles who may have Dementia or Alzheimer’s, they may no longer have the cognitive ability to ensure their financial plan can support the services they will need.

The time to ensure the financial part of the equation is balanced is earlier in life and this applies for couples as well as for singles who have entered their retirement years. In the absence of having family nearby, a first step would be to meet with a trusted party to review the current financial situation and simplify it as may be found necessary. This will lower the stress of wondering if bills can be paid on time or, in the long run, whether money will run out one day and what can be done to address such concerns.  Once a plan is in place and followed, there will be points within it that will trigger change. Such changes could include a means to handle bill payments and other financial activities if needed. This could mean having an accountant help with monthly financial activities, bank account reconciliations, investment income changes, etc. A final stage in the planning for some people could mean their entering a Seniors’ Facility where they can continue to live as independent a life as possible but be in a location where 7 x 24 hour care is possible.

A good way to start is to meet with a person who can describe the services available and lay out a plan for the coming years. Upon review of the plan that would be tailored specifically for the individual or couple, the decision to continue and follow through with its recommendations or to have someone assist in its execution. The level of involvement by the trusted and capable party would be such that it could simply be an assessment or one that would assign a person to meet on a periodic basis and carry out all the tasks necessary to allow the senior time to enjoy their life without the worry of missing a bill payment or feeling that they are missing out on one or another aspect of their life.

Posted by Admin-FCI in Seniors Health and Wellness, 0 comments
Resident and Family Councils Act

Resident and Family Councils Act

New Alberta Legislation

Alberta Resident and Family Councils Act

In a move that should give beleaguered families more say over the quality of life their loved ones receive in long-term care facilities, the Alberta government has passed the Resident and Family Councils Act.  The NDP’s new legislation, which came into effect in April 2018, guarantees residents and families the rights to establish self-governing councils in long-term care facilities.  That means if a home is providing substandard food, services or activities, the law requires them to work with the family council to resolve any concerns.  The councils are seen as a way for residents and their families to be more involved and in control of their lives.

“As a government, we completely agree that Albertans should have a voice in these matters,” said Sarah Hoffman, Alberta’s minister of health.

If you are interested in setting up a family or resident council, download the toolkit now.

 

Posted by Admin-FCI in Seniors Health and Wellness, 0 comments