later years

Aging in Place

October 21st  @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

South Health Campus

4448 Front St SE

Wellness Class Room 180006  

Call 403-243-9901 to register as space is limited

“Aging in Place” means having access to various services and the health and social supports you need to live safely and independently in your home for as long as you wish or are able. Aging well involves being honest with yourself and having a plan. Most Canadians want to remain in their own homes for as long as possible.

This workshop is designed to get you thinking about all 9 areas of life to consider when Aging in Place. Start to draft a plan to age well.

Register thru Eventbrite www.eventbrite.com/e/aging-in-place-tickets-63259867968

Or call Jill Chambers with Aging in Place Supports at 403 472 6445.

Aging In Place

“Aging in Place” means having access to various services and the health and social supports you need to live safely and independently in your home for as long as you wish or are able. Aging well involves being honest with yourself and having a plan. Most Canadians want to remain in their own homes for as long as possible.

This workshop is designed to get you thinking about all 9 areas of life to consider when Aging in Place. Start to draft a plan to age well.

This workshop works for individuals planning their own futures, or family members wanting to be proactive with their loved ones. Spaces are limited to 25, register today to secure your seat!

Live with Grace, Age in Place

Live with Grace, Age in Place is a seniors fair showcasing local seniors services in the areas of lifestyle, planning, health, and wealth.

About this Event

Live with Grace, Age in Place is a senior’s fair showcasing local seniors services in the areas of lifestyle, planning, health, and wealth.

About Live with Grace, Age in Place

This seniors’ fair boasts 20 local vendors showcasing services for seniors. This event is an opportunity to connect with local senior service business to address current or future needs.

Informative Presentations

We’re also pleased to offer ten half-hour presentations that showcase different topics regarding a healthy lifestyle, smart planning, and how to Age in Place. The schedule will be made available once confirmed. Please continue to check this page for updates.

Who should attend?

  • Retirees wanting to Age in Place and have a plan should their abilities decline
  • Pre-retirees wondering what is currently available
  • Adult children of seniors doing the leg work for their parents
  • Professionals working with seniors (networking)
  • Seniors Groups wanting a pleasant afternoon in a country club

Our vision for the Live with Grace, Age in Place fair is for families to come in and learn about senior services in an upscale venue, enjoy a drink and finger foods, mingle with other families, and connect with professionals that can address their current and future needs.

For more information on the organizers, please visit https://ohanacare.ca or http://financial-concierge.ca

Prevent Elder Fraud by Getting Rid of Junk Mail

Thieving fraudsters are making a business of taking advantage of older adults. Almost 4 in 10 seniors are affected, losing over $3.6 billion each year.

And this isn’t only happening to the very old or those with Alzheimer’s or dementia – younger, more educated seniors are actually losing more money.

Did you know that the amount of junk mail your older adult receives is a sign of their fraud risk?

Getting rid of junk mail might seem like a lot of work, but it’s well worth it if it protects your older adult from losing their life savings to fraud.

  • Shred those pre-approved credit card applications

Putting a stop to the junk mail being sent to your older adult’s house is essential for reducing their fraud risk.

  • Have sign on the mailbox “No junk mail or flyers”.
  • If mail delivered to a superbox or bank of mailboxes in a building, have the postal carrier put a sticker in your slot indicating “No junk mail or flyers”.

It also reduces the risk that someone with early dementia would repeatedly donate to multiple charities, sign up for many credit cards, or spend an excessive amount on catalog purchases.

Posted by Admin-FCI in Financial Abuse, 0 comments

Power of Attorney and Personal Directive for Seniors

Why are Power of Attorney and Personal Directive so Important for Seniors?

Bring up talk about legal documents and many people’s eyes begin to glaze over, especially if you’re a family caregiver. After all, you have enough to do caring for your senior loved one without worrying about complicated legal issues and paperwork, right? However, two legal documents can potentially be important in the life of family caregivers and the seniors for whom they care: Personal Directive and Power of Attorney.

Generally, a Power of Attorney “POA” is a legal document that gives an individual the power to act on another person’s behalf. In other words, having this document in place could give the older adult in your life the confidence in knowing that choices about their financial life would not be left in the hands of a stranger if they no longer could make decisions for themselves. A POA allows adults over the age of 18 to designate another adult to manage their financial affairs if, because of health issues, they couldn’t.

More specifically, an enduring POA is one that can stay in effect even when the individual can no longer make decisions on their own or loses capacity because of a physical, mental, or cognitive condition.

So why go through the hassle of putting these legal documents in place? Not doing so can creates a risk. For instance, if something happens to your loved one who does not have an enduring power of attorney, you may have to go to court to get the authority to handle that person’s financial affairs and that can take weeks to months.

  • POAs have the ability to give seniors who have them in place greater control over their lives. For example, if you were your mother’s POA and she could no longer handle her business affairs, you would have the authority to pay bills, manage her daily business dealings, manage property, file taxes and apply for public benefits such as CPP or GIS.

A Personal Directive is a “medical” power of attorney legal document.  In general, a Personal Directive makes one individual a healthcare Agent for another. Depending on the situation, this can allow the Agent to do, for example, the following:

  • Direct the medical care that someone needs. For instance, if your father was ill or needed surgery and you were his healthcare Agent, you could work with medical professionals to determine the type of care he receives, the doctors and care providers who treat him, and even where he lives while he recovers.

There are certain things POAs cannot do:

  • Change someone’s will
  • Make decisions after their death (unless, for example, the POA is also the executor of the will)
  • Change or transfer POA to someone else

Remember, it’s important for you to obtain such documents as well. All adults 18 and over need these documents to help ensure their wishes are carried out if they are no longer able to make decisions for themselves.  A terrific graduation present for those young adults in your life.

Posted by Admin-FCI in Seniors Health and Wellness, 0 comments